Getting up close and personal with your subjects through macro photography provides fresh new views and enhances your photo collections. Here´s a brief look at the ins and outs of macro photography along with considerations and tips.

Want a little extra oomph out of your photos? Start using the macro setting on your digital camera or invest in a macro lens for your SLR. By getting up close and personal, you’ll see the world in a whole new way and so will anyone viewing your images especially in areas such as Perth Australia.

What is Macro Photography?

Macro photography is more than zooming in for a close up. With macro photography, the photographer actually gets as physically close to the subject as possible with a goal of reproducing an image at a one to one (or closer) ratio. Because the focal length is quite short, it’s important to have a lens capable of achieving this type of magnification. Many of these techniques you can learn in online photography courses in Australia.

While purists apply the term macro to images that have a vi or closer ratio, you don’t necessarily need to get out your measuring tape and calculator to enjoy experimenting with your macro settings. It doesn’t matter what you call it if the image is stunning and one of the best ways to get incredible images is to get up close and personal.

What You Should Know about Shooting Macro Photos The depth of field at these ranges is far shallower than you may be used to. Because of this, it’s important to use the smallest F-stop possible for optimal crispness. Since you’ll be using a small aperture setting, lighting your subject becomes critical. However, a catch-n occurs. Your camera’s lens is often right up against the subject making adding light nearly impossible. You may need to compromise by settling for a wider aperture setting or getting creative with your light source.

Focusing is also critical because at this magnification, the slightest blur becomes a major distraction. The shallow depth of field can be your best friend or your worst enemy when it comes to shooting macro images. Use it to draw attention to your subject just as you would when shooting other images with shallow depths of field. Understand that you can minimize this effect by closing the aperture but doing so requires compensation in the form of more light or longer exposure times.

Since longer exposure times require complete stillness during exposure, use a tripod and a shutter cable (or timer) to ensure that the camera doesn’t move while taking the picture. If you’re using a digital camera, you will be able to see the results immediately and make adjustments as needed.

Uses for Macro Photography

Besides being fun, macro photography has a variety of uses. Imagine jazzing up your travel photos by including macro shots of the local currency or seashells on the beaches of Perth. Artists often use macro shots of flowers, fruits, and other subjects that they plan to paint. Macro photography also has its practical uses. For example, when taking a home inventory, take macro shots of serial and model numbers to further document your possessions. Selling products on eBay? Include macro images of details that either will entice buyers or inform them of the item’s condition.

The more you use macro photography, the more you’ll start seeing the world a little bit differently. Get up close and personal with your subjects and create stunning, intimate images.

Please like & share:
Subscribe for Updates
Do You Travel On US Hwy 27?
Enter your email to be alerted about news, happenings and money saving coupons from Rome businesses